Journal d’une chatière

LOUIS CATORZE EST SANS CÔNE. Oui, Mesdames et Messieurs: after 7.5 weeks of being Côned, he was freed a day or two ago (but we didn’t blog it immediately in case it all turned to merde and we had to reCône him again).

Had we not been in lockdown we probably would have unCôned him a little earlier, but we didn’t want to risk him scratching his delicate bald skin and developing an infection at a time when the vets are inundated and only taking emergency appointments. To be absolutely safe, we agreed to let a little more fur grow back around his eyes to form a protective layer against scratching or over-zealous washing and, although it took AGES, we are really, really glad we waited.

The good news is that he is now able to fit through the tiny gap that takes him from the Zone Occupé (Le Château) into the Zone Libre (the playground at The Back).

The bad news is that he has completely forgotten where/what the cat flap is, and how to use it. This is rather troubling as his initial cat flap training, when he first came to live with us, was quite arduous, with him taking around five and a half months to learn how to go out and another couple of weeks to learn how to come in again.

Curiously, he is more than able to scale huge fences and cross from garden to garden (see below). THAT part of his brain has somehow survived the Côning. But he no longer knows how to push his silly, empty head against a little door that he has used about 837 times a day for the last 5 years.

Cat Daddy: “Don’t tell me we’re going to have to retrain him?”

Me: “Erm …”

Cat Daddy: “[Unrepeatable expletives]”

Oh well. The one thing we have right now is time.

2-metre fence? Aucun problème. Cat flap? NON.

18 thoughts on “Journal d’une chatière

  1. It’s sort of Iike the troglodyte protestors in the US who don’t really know what they’re asking for…will have to see if the Catorzevirus-4 comes back. I hope not for all your sakes. Bonne chance!

    Liked by 4 people

  2. We found the easiest way to flap train was to tie the cat flap up and open. Rather cumbersome and Heath Robinson but it has inevitably worked. The cat in training learnt to come and go, already trained cats could come and go too. After a week or so we drop the cat flap back down and have tended to find the new cat worked out the actual head bump to get out. Some we have had to resort to us doing the owner each side with treats as a reinforcer but I doubt you and CD will find that an easy method!
    Good luck x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the tips! Yes, it was the full-on head bump that somehow evaded Catorze the first time he learned. We would prop the flap open with sticks of ever-decreasing size, and eventually it would go from a tiny matchstick to being fully shut. That was the sticking point. 🤣🤣🤣

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Yay! for the removal of Le Cône but Doh! for the catflap although I suspect he may, as your other correspondent has said be taking advantage of the situation to have his slaves let him in and out as we all know this is the preferred feline method of ingress and egress….

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Raccoons – yes ! Possums too ! So our huMom remains the door person.

    Catorze apparently has chosen to no longer hide his super powers and is no longer using the cat door because he doesn’t care who knows he is NO ORDINARY CAT !

    Liked by 1 person

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