La prise de la Bastille

One of our neighbours popped round a couple of days ago, and not only did he overhear Louis Catorze’s tormenting of Oscar 2 weekends back, but the little sod has, on numerous occasions, broken into his house. Through an UPPER FLOOR window. 

And, on the most recent occasion, a member of his family found him pitter-pattering around their landing, screaming, because said window had been shut and he couldn’t get back out. 

“Mortified” doesn’t even BEGIN to describe how Cat Daddy and I felt upon learning this news. And “mystified” would have been our second adjective of choice, had we not remembered what used to happen in our previous home when we were attempting to train Catorze to use the cat flap. Long story short: he wasn’t having any of it and, instead, chose the Mission Impossible route in and out via next door’s fence, their conservatory roof and our upstairs bathroom window. During one outward (we assume) journey he even managed to get a large bottle of mouthwash stuck in the slats of the Venetian blind. To this day, we have no idea how he did this.

We also recalled that, just like his big brother, Luther, Sa Majesté was a master of going into places where he had no business being. Our next-door neighbour at the time would often text me saying, “There’s a black cat in my house. Is it yours?” And, when the texts stopped, I assumed it meant that Catorze was no longer impinging but, in actual fact, the neighbour had simply got to know him so there was no need to ask me if he were mine. The same lady also once heard scrabbling around under her bed and thought she had mice but, when she looked, it was Catorze.

So now that we know HOW, the only question is WHY the little sod would break into a house that has traces of dog in it, that doesn’t have a supply of food (both of which should make it less attractive to an impinging cat) and that is occupied mainly by ladies (which should make it less attractive to Catorze). And I don’t suppose there’s much we can do to stop him. We are just lucky that we have patient, understanding neighbours who like us. 

Cat Daddy: “For now. Our neighbours like us FOR NOW.”

This photo was taken last month but I love it because it sums up Le Roi’s arrogant and entitled attitude, surveying his Château and all the neighbours’ adjoining Châteaux which, it seems, are also his Châteaux:

5 thoughts on “La prise de la Bastille

      1. Perhaps Le Roi has some Russian in his background. There’s a saying that I don’t know to spell in Russian on an English keyboard, but it goes: What’s mine is mine and what’s yours in mine.”

        Liked by 2 people

  1. Yes, Catorze sounds like the sort of cat that I would have no trouble getting along with. As you probably know, cats are famous for their curiosity, though I agree the have much less curiosity regarding dogs… But aside from that, most don’t believe that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. When going anywhere, they like to take the inspiring path. So I can see why he would go in the way you described, but as for the trick of passing the bottle through the blinds… I have no idea. A pleasure visiting you and your friends. Where am I? Is this France?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We are in London, U.K., not France. So Catorze is a bit of an impostor. But I’m sure that if you went through the ancestry of most monarchs through history, they would surprise you! Thank you for your lovely comments! 🇫🇷🌞👑

      Liked by 1 person

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